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CONSUMER RIGHT TO KNOW

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP)

 

Guidelines and Procedures:

 

Purpose
 
Medical Allied Career Center (MACC) is dedicated to the safety, health and welfare of its students, faculty and staff.  The unlawful use and or abuse of drugs and alcohol can have a negative impact on the safety and well-being of college students and on our MACC educational environment. 
 
The primary purpose of the following guidelines are in support of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP) developed and implemented in an effort to prevent the unlawful possession, use, and distribution of drugs and alcohol on campus and at recognized events and activities.  The College aspires to educate, call our community to action, help those in need, and be in full compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA).
 


Guidelines

I. Entities Affected by this Policy
Persons covered by the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP)are employees of MACC and students who enroll in one or more classes for any type of academic credit except for continuing education units.

 

II. Standards of Conduct
MACC complies with local, state, and federal laws and penalties regarding the unlawful use of drugs and alcohol including the possession of illegal drugs and drug paraphernalia on college premises and the sale or use of alcoholic beverages on MACC premises. (Please see DRUG AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY)

 

III. Disciplinary Procedures
MACC believes it is the responsibility of all employees and students to report prohibited use or abuse of drugs and alcohol.  If a student/employee is suspected of violating the Drug and Substance Abuse Policy of the MACC, the College will perform an investigation to determine the appropriate course of action. An Incident Report (student or employee) detailing alleged violations of the Standards of Conduct by an MACC student/employee will need to be completed to initiate the Disciplinary Actions/Due Process procedures.

 

IV. Disciplinary Sanctions
Violations of the MACC Standards of Conduct refer to a student’s failure to meet his/her responsibilities and are subject to General Disciplinary Action in accordance with college policy as stated in the MACC Student Handbook and School Catalog.

Sanctions The School Director has the authority to issue sanction(s) including, but not limited to, the following:

a. Written reprimand
b. Loss of privileges/access
c. Removal from course/s
d. Warning
e. Suspension
f. Expulsion
g. Termination (employee)
h. Referral for prosecution (student and/or employee)

 

V. DAAPP Information Dissemination
Notification of the information contained in the DAAPP is distributed to all enrolled students registered in classes for academic credit in the following methods:

  • Admissions application notification to all applicants
  • End of semester notification to all students
  • Catalog and/or Registration guide
  • Online student handbook
  • MACC main website (Consumer Right To Know)

Notification of the information contained in the DAAPP is distributed to all employees in the first day of employment and annually thereafter.

 

VI. Program Resources for Individual and Group Counseling
A list of local resources with descriptions of drug and alcohol counseling treatment, rehabilitation or reentry programs available to students are provided below:

 

New Beginnings Interfaith Drug and Alcohol Treatment Care Center
New Beginnings Interfaith Drug and Alcohol Treatment Care Center is an alcohol rehab and drug treatment program that is located at
3119 Torrance Blvd #36D
Torrance, CA 90503
You can contact New Beginnings Interfaith Drug and Alcohol Treatment Care Center by calling (310) 904-6782.
Types of Services
Methadone Maintenance, Hospital Inpatient Treatment, Gay and Lesbian, Residential Beds for Children, Methadone Detox, Transitional Housing, Men, Women, seniors
Payment Structure & Forms
Sliding Scale Fee

 

Driver Benefits Inc.
Driver Benefits Inc. is an alcohol rehab and drug rehabilitation program that is located at
2370 West Carson Street Suite 150
Torrance, CA 90501
You can contact Driver Benefits Inc. by calling (310) 320-9550.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, DUI Offenders, Court Appointed Clients, Spanish Speaking, Languages other than Spanish
Payment Structure & Forms
Self-Pay

 

National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dep
National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dep is an alcohol rehab and drug treatment center that is located at
1334 Post Avenue
Torrance, CA 90501
You can contact National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dep by calling (310) 328-1460.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, DUI Offenders, Court Appointed Clients, Spanish Speaking
Payment Structure & Forms
Self-Pay

 

Options for Recovery
Options for Recovery is a drug rehabilitation and alcohol treatment program that is located at
1124 West Carson Street Building N-33
Torrance, CA 90502
You can contact Options for Recovery by calling (310) 222-5410.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, Drug and Alcohol Day Treatment, Pregnant Women, Women
Payment Structure & Forms
Sliding Scale Fee, Help with Payments

 

South Bay Drug Abuse Coalition
South Bay Drug Abuse Coalition is an alcohol treatment and drug treatment facility that is located at
2370 West Carson Street Suite 136
Torrance, CA 90501
You can contact South Bay Drug Abuse Coalition by calling (310) 328-0780.
Types of Services
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment, Outpatient Treatment, Services for Minors, Pregnant Women, Women, Men, Court Appointed Clients, Hearing Impaired Clients
Payment Structure & Forms
Private Pay, Self-Pay, Sliding Scale Fee, Help with Payments

 

Thelma McMillen Center
Thelma McMillen Center is a drug rehab and alcoholism treatment center that is located at
3333 Skypark Drive
Torrance, CA 90505
You can contact Thelma McMillen Center by calling (310) 257-5760.
Types of Services
Drug and Alcohol Detox, Outpatient Treatment, Services for Minors
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicaid Assistance, Medicare Assistance, Private Pay, Military Insurance, Self-Pay

 

Twin Town Treatment Centers
Twin Town Treatment Centers is an alcohol rehabilitation and drug rehab center that is located at
2171 Torrance Boulevard Suites 8 and 9
Torrance, CA 90501
You can contact Twin Town Treatment Centers by calling (310) 787-1335.
Types of Services
Drug and Alcohol Detox, Outpatient Treatment, Drug and Alcohol Day Treatment, Services for Minors
Payment Structure & Forms
Private Pay, Self-Pay

 

Western Health Harbor City Clinic
Western Health Harbor City Clinic is an alcohol rehab and drug treatment facility that is located at
1647 West Anaheim Street
Harbor City, CA 90710 You can contact Western Health Harbor City Clinic by calling (310) 534-5590.
Types of Services
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment, Drug and Alcohol Detox, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detox, Outpatient Treatment, Dual Diagnosis, HIV - AIDS, Gay and Lesbian, Seniors, Pregnant Women, Women, Men, Court Appointed Clients, Spanish Speaking, Languages other than Spanish
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicaid Assistance, Medicare Assistance, Private Pay, Military Insurance, Self-Pay, Sliding Scale Fee

 

South Bay Alcoholism Services
South Bay Alcoholism Services is an alcohol treatment and drug rehabilitation program that is located at 23752 Gulf Avenue Carson, CA 90745 You can contact South Bay Alcoholism Services by calling (562) 200-1702.
Types of Services
Transitional Housing

 

Greenfields Health Services Inc.
Greenfields Health Services Inc. is an alcohol rehab and drug rehabilitation program that is located at
637 East Albertoni Street Suite 109
Carson, CA 90746
You can contact Greenfields Health Services Inc by calling (310) 532-0063.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, Drug and Alcohol Day Treatment, Services for Minors, Dual Diagnosis, HIV - AIDS, Gay and Lesbian, Seniors, Women, Men, Court Appointed Clients, Hearing Impaired Clients, Spanish Speaking, Languages other than Spanish
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicaid Assistance, Medicare Assistance, Private Pay, Military Insurance, Self-Pay, Sliding Scale Fee, Help with Payments

 

Counseling and Research Associates
Counseling and Research Associates is an alcohol addiction treatment and drug rehab program that is located at
130 West Victoria Street
Gardena, CA 90248
You can contact Counseling and Research Associates by calling (310) 715-2020.
Types of Services
Mental Health Treatment, Outpatient Treatment, Services for Minors, Dual Diagnosis, Pregnant Women, Spanish Speaking, Languages other than Spanish
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicaid Assistance

 

Be Well Now Institute Inc.
Be Well Now Institute Inc. is an alcohol treatment and drug rehabilitation facility that is located at 20710 South Leapwood Avenue Suite C Carson, CA 90746 You can contact Be Well Now Institute Inc. by calling (310) 324-0447.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, Services for Minors, Languages other than Spanish
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicaid Assistance, Sliding Scale Fee, Help with Payments

 

Goretti Health Services Inc.
Goretti Health Services Inc. is a drug treatment and alcoholism treatment facility that is located at
14623 Hawthorne Boulevard Suite 306                                                                                                                    
Lawndale, CA 90260
You can contact Goretti Health Services Inc. by calling (310) 973-0100.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, Services for Minors, HIV - AIDS, Seniors, Pregnant Women, Women, Men
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicare Assistance, Private Pay, Self-Pay, Sliding Scale Fee

 

Lawndale Medical and
Lawndale Medical and is an alcohol rehab and drug rehab facility that is located at
4023 Marine Avenue
Lawndale, CA 90260
You can contact Lawndale Medical and by calling (310) 675-9555.
Types of Services
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment, Drug and Alcohol Detox, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detox, Outpatient Treatment, Spanish Speaking
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicare Assistance, Private Pay, Self-Pay

 

Transcultural Health Development
Transcultural Health Development is an alcohol rehabilitation and drug rehab center that is located at
117 East Harry Bridges Boulevard
Wilmington, CA 90744
You can contact Transcultural Health Development by calling (310) 549-8383.
Types of Services
Drug and Alcohol Detox, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detox, Outpatient Treatment, HIV - AIDS, Women, Hearing Impaired Clients, Spanish Speaking, Languages other than Spanish
Payment Structure & Forms
Private Pay, Self-Pay

 

Behavioral Health Services
Behavioral Health Services is a drug treatment and alcohol rehab center that is located at
15519 Crenshaw Boulevard
Gardena, CA 90249
You can contact Behavioral Health Services by calling (310) 679-9031x1211.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, DUI Offenders, Court Appointed Clients, Spanish Speaking
Payment Structure & Forms
Private Pay, Self-Pay

 

Asian American Drug Abuse Program Inc.
Asian American Drug Abuse Program Inc. is an alcohol rehab and drug treatment facility that is located at
13931 South Van Ness Avenue
Gardena, CA 90249
You can contact Asian American Drug Abuse Program Inc. by calling (310) 768-8018.
Types of Services
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment, Outpatient Treatment, Services for Minors, Gay and Lesbian, Court Appointed Clients, Spanish Speaking
Payment Structure & Forms
Help with Payments

 

Your Empowering Solutions Inc.
Your Empowering Solutions Inc. is a drug rehab and alcohol rehabilitation program that is located at
4020 Palos Verdes Drive North Suite 201
Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274
You can contact Your Empowering Solutions Inc. by calling (310) 541-6350.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, Dual Diagnosis, HIV - AIDS, Gay and Lesbian, Seniors, Pregnant Women, Women, Men
Payment Structure & Forms
Self Pay

 

Southland Outpatient Recovery Center
Southland Outpatient Recovery Center is an alcohol rehab and drug rehabilitation center that is located at
431 West Compton Boulevard
Compton, CA 90220
You can contact Southland Outpatient Recovery Center by calling (310) 637-0341.
Types of Services
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment, Outpatient Treatment, Services for Minors, Dual Diagnosis, HIV - AIDS, Gay and Lesbian, Seniors, Pregnant Women, Women, Men, Court Appointed Clients, Spanish Speaking
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicaid Assistance, Medicare Assistance, Private Pay, Military Insurance, Self-Pay

 

Get Off Drugs Treatment Center
Get Off Drugs Treatment Center is a drug treatment and alcoholism treatment program that is located at
1416 South Tamarind Street
Compton, CA 90220
You can contact Get Off Drugs Treatment Center by calling (562) 422-5212.
Types of Services
Residential Long-Term Rehab
Payment Structure & Forms
Self-Pay

 

Priority Healthcare Services Inc.
Priority Healthcare Services Inc. is a drug treatment and alcoholism treatment program that is located at
2023 West Compton Boulevard
Compton, CA 90220

You can contact Priority Healthcare Services Inc. by calling (310) 763-7000.
Types of Services
Outpatient Treatment, Gay and Lesbian, Seniors
Payment Structure & Forms
Medicare Assistance, Private Pay, Self-Pay

 

 

VII. Oversight Responsibility
 
The school director and financial aid director shall serve as the main contacts that will have oversight responsibility of the Student DAAPP including, but not limited to: updates, coordination of information required in the DAAPP, coordination of the annual notification to students, and the biennial review report.

VIII. Assessment of Program Effectiveness and Biennial Report

The school director and financial aid director will review documented infractions of the student conduct policy on an annual basis. The assessment includes reviewing the incident(s) and the outcome(s) to ensure that college policy regarding drug, alcohol and other substance abuse violations and sanctions are imposed and consistently enforced.

The school director and financial aid director will conduct an annual review to determine program effectiveness and implement changes as necessary.  The school director and financial aid director will prepare a biennial review report as required to be in full compliance with the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) 34 CFR Part 86.100.

A review of the number of documented cases regarding students of concerns referred through MACC’s behavioral intervention team(s) will be gathered for statistical purposes and to ensure prevention and awareness activities are delivered appropriately to all student populations.

Under the leadership of the school director an assessment to measure student perceptions and behavior will be conducted periodically. These data will be analyzed to continuously determine the most appropriate interventions.

IX. Policy History

The DAAPP for students and policy with accompanied guidelines will be reviewed on an annual basis to ensure that it accurately reflects institutional policy, procedures and programs; and to consider expansion of evaluation, prevention, and awareness activities.

X. Related Documents

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP) Drug Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) Drug Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) Administrative Rule, DUG AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY

 

XI. Health Risks Associated with Alcohol and Drugs

Alcohol

Alcohol is a legal drug.  Nonetheless, it is a depressant and is the leading drug of abuse in America.  Use of alcohol may affect judgment and decision-making abilities, slow down the central nervous system and brain function, and reduce coordination and reflex actions.  Alcohol use (even low doses) may increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including physical altercations, threats, and domestic abuse. Higher doses may cause marked impairments in mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses may cause respiratory depression and death.  Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, also can lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver.  
 A 12-oz. can of beer, a 5-oz. glass of wine and a 1.5-oz. shot of hard liquor all contain the same amount of alcohol.  Coffee, cold showers and exercise do not speed up the body’s ability to metabolize alcohol – only the passage of time will free the body from the effects of alcohol.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF ABUSE

  • Dulled mental processes
  • Lack of coordination
  • Slowed reaction time
  • Poor judgment
  • Reduced inhibitions

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even small amounts alcohol can significantly impair the judgment, reaction time and coordination needed to safely operate equipment or drive a car.

 

HEALTH EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL

  • Decreased sexual functioning
  • Liver cancer, fatty liver, hepatitis, cirrhosis
  • Increased cancers of the mouth, tongue, pharynx, esophagus, rectum, breast and skin
  • Kidney disease
  • Ulcers
  • Increased acid in the stomach
  • Insomnia
  • Gout
  • Contributes to high blood pressure and strokes
  • Heart muscle disease or heart failure
  • Use during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome, increased risk of miscarriages, premature births, stillbirths, and low-birth-weight babies;
  • Increased blood sugar levels which makes diabetes worse;
  • Increased severity of mental health problems such as bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, and addiction

Marijuana

Marijuana is a derivative of the cannabis sativa plant and is illegally used for its intoxicating effects and dreamy state of relaxation and euphoria.  All forms of marijuana have negative physical and mental effects.  Long-term users of marijuana may develop tolerance levels requiring more and more marijuana to achieve the same “high”.  Prolonged use leads to dependence, and the drug can become the center of users’ lives.  The active ingredient in marijuana is Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.
 
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF USE

  • Several regularly observed physical effects of marijuana include:
  • substantial increase in heart rate
  • bloodshot eyes
  • dry mouth and throat
  • increased appetite
  • chronic sore throat
  • Use of marijuana also has mental effects that may include:
  • impaired or reduced short-term memory and comprehension
  • altered sense of time
  • changed sensory perception--sight, smell, hearing, touch
  • reduced ability to perform tasks requiring concentration and coordination, such as driving a car
  • Research also shows that people do not retain knowledge when they are “high”. Motivation and cognition may be altered, making the acquisition of new information difficult. Marijuana also can produce paranoia and psychosis.

HEALTH EFFECTS

  • Emphysema-like symptoms
  • Respiratory track and sinus infections
  • Lowered immune system response
  • Because users often inhale the unfiltered smoke deeply and then hold it in their lungs as long as possible, marijuana is damaging to the lungs and pulmonary system. Marijuana smoke contains more cancer-causing agents than tobacco smoke.

Inhalants

Inhalants are mood-altering substances that are voluntarily inhaled.  Most substances used are commercial and household products, such as solvents and aerosols, which are easily obtained and are not harmful, if used for the purpose intended and as directed. Because they are common products, inhalants often are a young person’s first attempt at “getting high”.  Inhalants can severely impair judgment and driving ability.  They also cause severe disorientation, visual distortion and confusion.  There is evidence that tolerance to the effects of inhalants develops with continued use so, users need to increase use to obtain the same high.  Studies have shown that dependence on inhalants continues even when the user goes on to use other drugs.  Inhalants include: Nitrous Oxide, laughing gas, propellant aerosol cans, Amyl Nitrite, poppers, snappers in ampules, Butyl Nitrite, rush, bullet, climax, aerosol sprays, aerosol paint cans, containers of cleaning fluid, gasoline, glue and paint thinner.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF USE

  • Inhaling solvents allows the substance to reach the bloodstream very quickly. The immediate negative effects of inhalants include:
  • nausea
  • sneezing
  • coughing
  • nosebleeds
  • fatigue
  • poor coordination
  • loss of appetite
  • Solvents and aerosol sprays also may decrease heart and respiratory rates.  Amyl and Butyl Nitrite cause rapid pulse, headaches and involuntary passing of urine and feces.

HEALTH EFFECTS

  • hepatitis
  • brain damage
  • debilitating effects on the central nervous system
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • electrolyte imbalance
  • muscle fatigue
  • permanent damage to the nervous system
  • Deeply inhaling the vapors, or using large amounts over a short time, may result in disorientation, violent behavior, unconsciousness or death. High concentrations of inhalants can cause suffocation by displacing the oxygen in the lungs or depressing the central nervous system to the point that breathing stops.

Cocaine

Cocaine is the most potent stimulant of organic origin and the most widely used of the stimulants.  Although cocaine has been used in the past as a topical anesthetic, its therapeutic uses have almost been eliminated due to the development of safer anesthetics.  Cocaine is a powerfully addictive drug leading to physical and psychological dependence.  Cocaine powder is sniffed or snorted.  Occasional use can cause a stuffy or runny nose, while chronic use can ulcerate the mucous membrane of the nose. Cocaine powder can also be injected into the bloodstream when it is mixed with water.  Preparation of freebase, which involves the use of volatile solvents, can result in death or injury from fire or explosion. Inhalation of cocaine fumes from freebasing produces effects that are very fast in onset, very intense and momentary in duration.  Crack is cocaine that is processed into tiny chips having the appearance of slivers of soap.  Crack has become a very popular form of cocaine, since it is inexpensive and relatively easy to use. It is smoked in a pipe or rolled with tobacco in a cigarette.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF USE

  • dilated pupils
  • increased pulse rate
  • elevated blood pressure
  • insomnia
  • loss of appetite
  • tactile hallucinations
  • paranoia
  • seizures
  • anxiety, agitation
  • periods of increased activity followed by fatigue and depression
  • wide mood swings
  • difficulty in concentration

HEALTH EFFECTS

  • Cocaine stimulates the central nervous system. Its effects include:
  • dilated pupils
  • elevated blood pressure
  • elevated heart rate
  • elevated respiratory rate
  • elevated body temperature
  • death by cardiac arrest or respiratory failure

OTHER STIMULANTS

Stimulants are drugs that stimulate the central nervous system and excite bodily activity. Methamphetamine is one of the fastest growing drugs of abuse.  These drugs create less intense and less expensive cocaine-like effects in the body.  Persons who use large amounts of amphetamines over a long period of time can develop an amphetamine psychosis that includes hallucinations, delusions and paranoia. These symptoms usually disappear when drug use ceases.  Amphetamines can be swallowed in pills or capsules, smoked as “crank” and “ice” or injected. An amphetamine injection creates a sudden increase in blood pressure that can result in stroke, very high fever or heart failure.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF USE

  • Mood changes
  • Impaired concentration
  • Impaired mental functioning
  • Swings between apathy and alertness
  • Restless, anxious and moody behavior. 

HEALTH EFFECTS

  • increased heart and respiratory rates
  • elevated blood pressure
  • sweating
  • headaches
  • blurred vision
  • dizziness
  • sleeplessness and anxiety
  • rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • tremors
  • poor coordination
  • physical collapse
  • Physical exertion while using stimulants can be dangerous because of the drugs’ effects on the body’s temperature-regulating and cardiovascular systems and can cause deaths in otherwise healthy young athletes.

Depressants

A depressant is a drug that depresses the central nervous system, resulting in sedation and a decrease in bodily activity.  Depressants, taken as prescribed by physicians, can be beneficial for the relief of anxiety, irritability, stress and tension.  The main classes of medical depressants are barbiturates and benzodiazepines. When regular users suddenly stop taking large doses, they can develop withdrawal symptoms ranging from restlessness, insomnia and anxiety to convulsions and death.  Babies born to mothers who abuse depressants during pregnancy may be physically dependent on the drugs and show withdrawal symptoms shortly after they are born. Birth defects and behavioral problems also may result.  Depressants are known as: barbiturates, downers and tranquilizers, such as Valium, Librium, Equanil, Serax, Tranxene and Zanax.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF USE

  • The effects of depressants are in many ways similar to the effects of alcohol. Small amounts can produce calmness and relaxed muscles, but somewhat larger doses can cause:
  • slurred speech
  • staggered walk
  • altered perception
  • mental clouding and drowsiness
  • respiratory depression
  • coma and death

HEALTH EFFECTS

  • physical and psychological dependence
  • tolerance to the drug, leading the user to increase the quantity consumed.

Hallucinogens

Hallucinogenic drugs distort the senses and often produce hallucinations--experiences that depart from reality.  Some negative health effects may last six months to a year following prolonged daily use.  Phencyclidine (PCP) interrupts the function of the neocortex, the section of the brain that controls the intellect and keeps instincts in check, because the drug blocks pain receptors. Violent PCP episodes may result in self-inflicted injuries.  Lysergic acid (LSD), mescaline and psilocybin also are hallucinogens that cause illusions and hallucinations. It is common to have a bad psychological reaction to LSD, mescaline and psilocybin. The user may experience panic, confusion, suspicion, anxiety and loss of control. Delayed effects or flashbacks can occur even after use has ceased.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF USE

  • impaired concentration
  • confusion and agitation
  • muscle rigidity
  • profuse sweating
  • a sense of distance and estrangement
  • muscular coordination worsens and senses are dulled
  • blocked and incoherent speech
  • dilated pupils
  • elevated body temperature
  • increased heart rate and blood pressure
  • loss of appetite
  • sleeplessness
  • tremors

HEALTH EFFECTS

  • persistent memory problems
  • speech difficulties
  • Mood disorders, such as depression, anxiety and violent behavior
  • paranoid and violent behavior
  • hallucinations
  • convulsions and coma
  • heart and lung failure.

Narcotics

Narcotic analgesics are the most effective compounds used for pain relief. Narcotic analgesics include Opium, Opiates (morphine, codeine, Percodan, heroin and dilaudid) and Opioids (synthetic substitutes such as Vicodin, Darvon, Demerol and methadone).  Narcotics can be smoked or eaten (opium), injected, taken orally or smoked (morphine), inhaled, injected or smoked (heroin).  Opiates also are known as: heroin, smack, horse, brown sugar and black tar.

 

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF USE

  • A feeling of euphoria that is often followed by:
  • drowsiness
  • nausea and vomiting
  • constricted pupils
  • watery eyes and itching
  • low and shallow breathing
  • clammy skin
  • impaired respiration
  • convulsions
  • coma
  • possible death

HEALTH EFFECTS

  • easy addition
  • addiction in pregnant women can lead to premature, stillborn or addicted infants who experience severe withdrawal symptoms.

Designer Drugs

Illegal drugs are defined in terms of their chemical formulas, but underground chemists can modify the molecular structure of certain illegal drugs to produce analogs known as designer drugs, which do not meet these definitions. These drugs can be several hundred times stronger than the drugs they are designed to imitate.  

Many of the so-called designer drugs are related to amphetamines and have mild stimulant properties but are mostly euphoriants. They can produce severe neurochemical damage to the brain. The narcotic analogs can cause symptoms such as those seen in Parkinson’s disease, including uncontrollable tremors, drooling, impaired speech, paralysis and irreversible brain damage. Analogs of amphetamines and methamphetamines cause nausea, blurred vision, chills or sweating and faintness.

Psychological effects include anxiety, depression and paranoia. As little as one dose can cause brain damage, and the designer drugs still cause illusions, hallucinations and impaired perception.
Some designer drugs are: Synthetic Heroin White, MPTP (New Heroin), analogs of MDMA (Ecstasy, XTC, Essence), hallucinogens (STP, PMA, EVE) and analogs of PCP.


ABHES VN Placement 2014-2015

 

Cohort Year Number of Graduates Number Placed in Field Number Place in Related Field Number Not Placed or Placed Out of Field Un-available
(Due to Health/
Incarceration/
Education/Military)
Placement Rate
2014-2015 18 12 0 3 3 80%